Behaviour Policy

    Behavior Policy-Full School

    Last reviewed: August 2019

    Responsible:

    Claire McGrory and Emma John, Deputy Heads in Pre-Prep School

    Siobhan Bee and Laura Oliver, Assistant Heads in Prep School

    Wayne Davis, Deputy Head (Pastoral) in the Senior School


    Please note: This policy follows the guidelines highlighted in the ADEK Policy and Guidelines for Managing Student Behaviour as well as the Behaviour and Discipline in Schools (where relevant) guidance from the UK. 

    1. Introduction

    Cranleigh Abu Dhabi aims to encourage its pupils to adopt the highest possible standards and expectations of behaviour, values and morals. Expectations are designed to make it clear to the pupils how they are able to achieve these standards of behaviour around school and towards others. We encourage pupils and staff to treat everyone as an individual,  to celebrate our multi-cultural, inclusive and diverse school community. Promoting good behaviour and morals is an integral part of the ethos of Cranleigh Abu Dhabi as well as the foundations for our pastoral systems. Our foundation is built on The Cranleigh Code values and we aim to promote these values for all in our community. We believe that high expectations, good manners and a safe, secure learning environment play a crucial part in the development of intellectually curious and successful pupils, who are motivated to become life-long learners and positive citizens in their communities. Education is a partnership between staff, pupils and parents; ensuring that all parties in this triage have the highest values, morals and standards of behaviour in and outside of the classroom including the wider community. Our behaviour systems also follow the underpinning values in the Moral Education programme and are constantly highlighted and reinforced during tutor time, assemblies, lessons and everything we do at Cranleigh Abu Dhabi.

    1.1 Through the operation of this policy we aim to:

    • Create a positive, safe, consistent and secure learning environment encouraging mutual respect, kindness, adaptability and inclusivity.
    • Promote positive behaviour, morals and attitudes, rather than merely deter anti-social behaviour.
    • Ensure that the school’s expectations and behavioural strategies are pupil- centred, clear, consistent, fully understood, well known, followed and supported by the school community.
    • Foster a positive learning environment and social climate with high, consistent and realistic expectations.
    • Ensure all teachers’, learning and classroom expectations sit alongside the overall school’s behavioural policy and are in keeping with The Cranleigh Code and Moral Education programme underpinning values.
    • Ensure each individual is valued and celebrated within the year group or class as appropriate.
    • Create an environment that encourages, uses regular praise, rewards and reinforces positive behaviour building trusting relationships.
    • Encourage and develop self-discipline, empathy, self-esteem and a responsibility for all.
    • Show and promote honesty, courtesy and respect by being a good example, in order to enhance their sense of positive citizenship amongst the community.
    • Encourage pupils to think before they act and reflect on their behavioural choices. Provide training and support for all staff on the behavioural procedures at Cranleigh Abu Dhabi and to ensure pupils are all receiving the same message and standards of discipline throughout the school community. 
    • Ensure our behaviourl sanctions and procedures focus on preventative, developmental and fostering aspects.
    • Ensure pupils care for the facilities, property of the school and others belongings.
    • Ensure success and achievement are celebrated and shared through day-to-day lessons, assemblies and other whole school or year group events.
    • Encourage parents to also be active participants in promoting good behaviour and the values of The Cranleigh Code.
    • Encourage pupils to speak to any member of Cranleigh staff if they have a worry or concern.
    • Promote the fact that all staff, pupils and parents have a collective responsibility to the school for their behaviour and treatment towards others.

    2. Behaviour Management

    It is important the behavioural structure and lines of communication above are followed in order to ensure that behaviour is dealt with in an effective, efficient, fair and consistent way for all pupils. The class teacher or tutor is the first point of contact in the resolution of these matters. The class teacher or tutor will also discuss The Cranleigh Code and their behavioural expectations with each class and form. In this way, every child in the school understands the standards of behaviour that we expect within the school community.

    Low level behavioural incidents will be dealt with immediately by the subject or class teacher. Behaviour from day to day can be subjective and we also have to look at the bigger picture for each child to ensure we are dealing with it appropriately, supportively and fairly. Behaviour is dealt with through these channels to ensure there are incremental layers in place, which helps facilitate dealing with the nature of the incident, concern and or the pupil/s involved.

    All incidents will be dealt with appropriately and fairly, using the Cranleigh sanctions chart (following ADEKs guidelines) for guidance. Repeated or serious incidents might well be escalated up the scale more quickly.

    3. Rewards and Praise

    “Positive recognition and rewards, when used appropriately, may have a significant impact on shaping students attitudes, choices and behaviour.” (ADEC’s Guidelines for Managing Student Behaviour).

    Pupils should always have opportunities to be rewarded or praised for excellent behaviour and demonstration of The Cranleigh Code values. Recognition and micro- connections are key to promoting successful teacher-pupil relationships as well ensuring self- belief and self-worth for the pupil themselves. The emphasis is on rewards and praise to reinforce and promote positive behaviour. Rewards have a motivational effect, helping pupils to see that good behaviour is rewarded whether that be through a gesture, verbal communication, golden time, mystickers, rewards cards or emails home. The most common reward is praise, informal and formal, public and private, to individuals and groups. It is earned by maintaining good standards and behaviour as well as by particularly noteworthy achievements in personal and or social behavioural situations. The top end of the reward system below allows parents to be informed of the reward received by their child. We aim to enlist parental support in the positive reinforcement process so it carries on into the home environment.

    3.1 Examples of some of the rewards and use of praise used at Cranleigh. 

    The three schools operate slightly different reward systems but the ethos behind the rewarding of pupils remains the same.

    4. Sanctions

    If poor behaviour does occur the school also employs a number of sanctions to enforce expectations, and to ensure a safe and positive learning environment for all. We employ each sanction appropriately to each individual situation and pupil, including taking into consideration age and gender. There is no “one solution fits all”. The Cranleigh Code values are expectations that help our children to know what is acceptable or not: all pupils, staff and parents will be made fully aware of the details before the start of each academic year. The sanction process is also a learning and reflective process for the pupil. Everyone makes mistakes from time to time, but we encourage pupils to reflect on this so they take responsibility and know where it went wrong to prevent it from happening again.

    4.1 Through the operation of our sanctions system we aim to:

    • Always notify and explain to the pupil/s where they went wrong, whom it impacted on and how they can move forward to ensure they are aware of their behaviour and the reason for a change. Even for low level or one-off incidents. Conversation is key when reflecting on poor behaviour choices. 
    • Promote the safety of the children, which is paramount in all situations. If a child’s behaviour endangers the safety of others, the class teacher stops the activity and prevents the child from taking part for the rest of that session.
    • The Heads of Year (Pre Prep and Prep) and the Housemasters (Senior) may feel that behaviour witnessed in a particular cohort or number of tutor groups requires more of an open discussion, assembly or focus in the Moral Education: Learning for Life session; this can also be an example of how behaviour is dealt with.
    • Look at the bigger picture of a pupil to find out why the child is behaving in such a way and then deal with the situation accordingly. 
    • Communicate our expectations clearly, repeatedly and effectively so all are aware of what these are and what they include. Younger children may need further explanation or a role modelling of good behaviour. 
    • Use tutor time and assemblies to develop or review values or skills if necessary. 

    5. Serious disciplinary action

    Any particularly serious breaches of discipline will ultimately be dealt with by the Head of School or, in very serious cases, by the Headmaster. In cases of extreme and persistent poor behaviour, suspension and expulsion may be considered as appropriate courses of action.

    This document is reviewed annually

    Behaviour Policy-Pre-Prep School

    Last reviewed: 30/09/2018

    Responsible: Claire McGrory and Emma John, Deputy Heads in Pre-Prep School

    1. In addition to the introduction:

    Within Pre-Prep each child meets developmental milestones at different times, therefore many of our disciplinary decisions need to be made on a case-by-case basis. We follow the procedures outlined below as a guideline and use our knowledge of each individual child to come up with the most suitable rewards and sanctions. With that in mind, we also always hold the safety, wellbeing and happiness of all children paramount.

    In Pre-Prep we strive to have high quality teaching which challenges and engages pupils at all levels thus minimising low level disruption or behaviour. This increases motivation and promotes outstanding learning experiences. Having strong pastoral relationships, curriculum and practices promote positive behaviour, strong inter- personal skills and a sense of responsibility. Success and achievement are celebrated and shared throughout the academic year.

    We have clear and effective systems of behavioural management that allow pupils to reflect which helps to decrease behavioural issues. Children talk about their choices and are guided to come up with strategies to manage their own behaviour during sanctions, such as when they lose Golden Time. All academic and pastoral issues are recorded on the MIS system (iSAMS) under Pupil Notes and are easily disseminated by those that need to know.

    Pupil’s achievements are celebrated and we understand that pupils should be highlighted and praised for their effort and academic successes.

    2. In addition to Rewards and Praise

    Examples of some of our rewards and use of praise in the Pre-Prep School: 

       3. In addition to Sanctions – Behaviour Pyramid

    If poor behaviour does occur we also employ a number of sanctions in Pre-Prep to enforce expectations, and to ensure a safe and positive learning environment. We deliver each sanction appropriately to each individual situation and pupil including taking into consideration age. There is no one situation fits all. The Cranleigh Code values and are expectations helps the individual to know what is acceptable or not: all pupils, staff and parents will be made fully aware of the details before the start of each academic year. The sanction process is also a learning and reflective process for the pupil. Everyone makes mistakes but we encourage pupils to reflect on this so they take responsibility and know where it went wrong.

    3.1 Through the operation of our sanctions we aim to: 

    • Always notify and explain to the pupil/s where they went wrong, who it impacted and how they can move forward to ensure they are aware of their behaviour and the reason for a change. Even for low level or one off incidents. 
    • Promote the safety of the children which is paramount in all situations. If a child’s behaviour endangers the safety of others, the class teacher stops the activity and prevents the child from taking part for the rest of that session. 
    • The Heads of Year may feel the behaviour noted in a particular cohort or number of tutor groups requires more of an open discussion, assembly or focus in the Learning for Life session can also be an example of how behaviour is dealt with. 
    • Look at the bigger picture of a pupil to ensure why the child is behaving in such a way and then deal with the situation accordingly.

    Behaviour Management Plan

    If repetitive low level disruption is displayed a teacher may choose to put the child on a ‘Good Behaviour Plan’. These goals should be discussed and/or co-created with the pupil and parents as a united approach is encouraged and necessary to ensure it has the desired effect. The plan is written in child friendly language with explicit targets.



    The ‘My Choices’ form is printed with one, or at the most two, selected targets for the child to focus on each week. Stickers are placed next to each segment of the day if the child has been successful with their target. If not, a note should explain why in the ‘comments’ section. This is glued into the child’s planner as an immediate and open form of home/school communication.


    Behaviour Ladder Examples

    If a child’s behaviour is deemed unsafe towards themselves or others, or if the extreme manner of the behaviour warrants it, then the child will be placed on an individual behaviour plan. The plan is created specifically for the child and agreed upon by the teacher, Deputy Head of Pre-Prep, the SEN department and parents. Its focus is to guide the teacher and parents when dealing with certain behaviours. As the behaviour escalates, so too does the level of intervention and consequence.

    This document is reviewed annually